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Coretta Scott King Biography Human Rights Activist Leader

 
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cyrus
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 3:58 pm    Post subject: Coretta Scott King Biography Human Rights Activist Leader Reply with quote


Coretta Scott King Biography
Biography: Coretta Scott King
Pioneer of Civil Rights
Coretta Scott King Date of birth: April 27, 1927
Coretta Scott King Date of death: January 30, 2006





http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/printmember/kin1bio-1

Coretta Scott was born in Heiberger, Alabama and raised on the farm of her parents Bernice McMurry Scott, and Obadiah Scott, in Perry County, Alabama. She was exposed at an early age to the injustices of life in a segregated society. She walked five miles a day to attend the one-room Crossroad School in Marion, Alabama, while the white students rode buses to an all-white school closer by. Young Coretta excelled at her studies, particularly music, and was valedictorian of her graduating class at Lincoln High School. She graduated in 1945 and received a scholarship to Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. As an undergraduate, she took an active interest in the nascent civil rights movement; she joined the Antioch chapter of the NAACP, and the college's Race Relations and Civil Liberties Committees. She graduated from Antioch with a B.A. in music and education and won a scholarship to study concert singing at New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, Massachusetts.

In Boston she met a young theology student, Martin Luther King, Jr., and her life was changed forever. They were married on June 18, 1953, in a ceremony conducted by the groom's father, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr. Coretta Scott King completed her degree in voice and violin at the New England Conservatory and the young couple moved in September 1954 to Montgomery, Alabama, where Martin Luther King Jr. had accepted an appointment as Pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.


They were soon caught up in the dramatic events that triggered the modern civil rights movement. When Rosa Parks refused to yield her seat on a Montgomery city bus to a white passenger, she was arrested for violating the city's ordinances giving white passengers preferential treatment in public conveyances. The black citizens of Montgomery organized immediately in defense of Mrs. Parks, and under Martin Luther King's leadership organized a boycott of the city's buses. The Montgomery bus boycott drew the attention of the world to the continued injustice of segregation in the United States, and led to court decisions striking down all local ordinances separating the races in public transit. Dr. King's eloquent advocacy of nonviolent civil disobedience soon made him the most recognizable face of the civil rights movement, and he was called on to lead marches in city after city, with Mrs. King at his side, inspiring the citizens, black and white, to defy the segregation laws.


The visibility of Dr. King's leadership attracted fierce opposition from the supporters of institutionalized racism. In 1956, white supremacists bombed the King family home in Montgomery. Mrs. King and the couple's first child narrowly escaped injury. The Kings had four children in all: Yolanda Denise; Martin Luther, III; Dexter Scott; and Bernice Albertine. Although the demands of raising a family had caused Mrs. King to retire from singing, she found another way to put her musical background to the service of the cause. She conceived and performed a series of critically acclaimed Freedom Concerts, combining poetry, narration and music to tell the story of the Civil Rights movement. Over the next few years, Mrs. King staged Freedom Concerts in some of America's most distinguished concert venues, as fundraisers for the organization her husband had founded, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.


Dr. King's fame spread beyond the United States, and he was increasingly seen not only as a leader of the American civil rights movement, but as the symbol of an international struggle for human liberation from racism, colonialism and all forms of oppression and discrimination. In 1957, Dr. King and Mrs. King journeyed to Africa to celebrate the independence of Ghana. In 1959, they made a pilgrimage to India to honor the memory of Mahatma Gandhi, whose philosophy of nonviolence had inspired them. Dr. King's leadership of the movement for human rights was recognized on the international stage when he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace. In 1964, Mrs. King accompanied her husband when he traveled to Oslo, Norway to accept the Prize.

In the 1960s, Dr. King broadened his message and his activism to embrace causes of international peace and economic justice. Mrs. King found herself in increasing demand as a public speaker. She became the first woman to deliver the Class Day address at Harvard, and the first woman to preach at a statutory service at St. Paul's Cathedral in London. She served as a Women's Strike for Peace delegate to the 17-nation Disarmament Conference in Geneva, Switzerland in 1962. Mrs. King became a liaison to international peace and justice organizations even before Dr. King took a public stand in 1967 against United States intervention in the Vietnam War.


On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee. Channeling her grief, Mrs. King concentrated her energies on fulfilling her husband's work by building The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change as a living memorial to her husband's life and dream. Years of planning, fundraising and lobbying, lay ahead, but Mrs. King would not be deterred, nor did she neglect direct involvement in the causes her husband had championed. In 1969 , Coretta Scott King published the first volume of her autobiography, My Life with Martin Luther King Jr. In the 1970s, Mrs. King maintained her husband's commitment to the cause of economic justice. In 1974 she formed the Full Employment Action Council, a broad coalition of over 100 religious, labor, business, civil and women's rights organizations dedicated to a national policy of full employment and equal economic opportunity; Mrs. King served as Co-Chair of the Council.

In 1981, The King Center, the first institution built in memory of an African American leader, opened to the public. The Center is housed in the Freedom Hall complex encircling Dr. King's tomb in Atlanta, Georgia. It is part of a 23-acre national historic site that also includes Dr. King's birthplace and the Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he and his father both preached. The King Center Library and Archives houses the largest collection of documents from the Civil Rights era. The Center receives over one million visitors a year, and has trained tens of thousands of students, teachers, community leaders and administrators in Dr. King's philosophy and strategy of nonviolence through seminars, workshops and training programs.


Mrs. King continued to serve the cause of justice and human rights; her travels took her throughout the world on goodwill missions to Africa, Latin America, Europe and Asia. In 1983, she marked the 20th Anniversary of the historic March on Washington, by leading a gathering of more than 800 human rights organizations, the Coalition of Conscience, in the largest demonstration the capital city had seen up to that time.

Mrs. King led the successful campaign to establish Dr. King's birthday, January 15, as a national holiday in the United States. By an Act of Congress, the first national observance of the holiday took place in 1986. Dr. King's birthday is now marked by annual celebrations in over 100 countries. Mrs. King was invited by President Clinton to witness the historic handshake between Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Chairman Yassir Arafat at the signing of the Middle East Peace Accords in 1993. In 1985 Mrs. King and three of her children were arrested at the South African embassy in Washington, D.C., for protesting against that country's apartheid system of racial segregation and disenfranchisement. Ten years later, she stood with Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg when he was sworn in as President of South Africa.

After 27 years at the helm of The King Center, Mrs. King turned over leadership of the Center to her son, Dexter Scott King, in 1995. She remained active in the causes of racial and economic justice, and in her remaining years devoted much of her energy to AIDS education and curbing gun violence. Although she died in 2006 at the age of 78, she remains an inspirational figure to men and women around the world.

(Visit the King Center to learn more about the life and legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.)


(Hear poet and author Maya Angelou discuss Dr. King's historic
"I Have a Dream" speech.)


Last edited by cyrus on Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:12 pm; edited 5 times in total
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 4:03 pm    Post subject: Human Rights Activist and Leader Reply with quote

Mrs. Coretta Scott King Human Rights Activist and Leader

Source: http://www.thekingcenter.org/csk/bio.html

Biographical Information

Coretta Scott King is one of the most influential women leaders in our world today. Prepared by her family, education, and personality for a life committed to social justice and peace, she entered the world stage in 1955 as wife of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and as a leading participant in the American Civil Rights Movement. Her remarkable partnership with Dr. King resulted not only in four talented children, but in a life devoted to the highest values of human dignity in service to social change. Mrs. King has traveled throughout our nation and world speaking out on behalf of racial and economic justice, women's and children's rights, gay and lesbian dignity, religious freedom, the needs of the poor and homeless, full-employment, health care, educational opportunities, nuclear disarmament and ecological sanity. In her distinguished and productive career, she has lent her support to democracy movements world-wide and served as a consultant to many world leaders, including Corazon Aquino, Kenneth Kaunda, and Nelson Mandela.



Born and raised in Marion, Alabama, Coretta Scott graduated valedictorian from Lincoln High School. She received a B.A. in music and education from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and then went on to study concert singing at Boston's New England Conservatory of Music, where she earned a degree in voice and violin. While in Boston she met Martin Luther King, Jr. who was then studying for his doctorate in systematic theology at Boston University. They were married on June 18, 1953, and in September 1954 took up residence in Montgomery, Alabama, with Coretta Scott King assuming the many functions of pastor's wife at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.



During Dr. King's career, Mrs. King devoted most of her time to raising their four children: Yolanda Denise (1955), Martin Luther, III (1957), Dexter Scott (1961), and Bernice Albertine (1963). From the earliest days, however, she balanced mothering and movement work, speaking before church, civic, college, fraternal and peace groups. She conceived and performed a series of favorably-reviewed Freedom Concerts which combined prose and poetry narration with musical selections and functioned as fundraisers for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the direct action organization of which Dr. King served as first president. In 1957, she and Dr. King journeyed to Ghana to mark that country's independence. In 1958, they spent a belated honeymoon in Mexico, where they observed first-hand the immense gulf between extreme wealth and extreme poverty. In 1959, Dr. and Mrs. King spent nearly a month in India on a pilgrimage to disciples and sites associated with Mahatma Gandhi. In 1964, she accompanied him to Oslo, Norway, where he received the Nobel Peace Prize. Even prior to her husband's public stand against the Vietnam War in 1967, Mrs. King functioned as liaison to peace and justice organizations, and as mediator to public officials on behalf of the unheard.



Since her husband's assassination in 1968, Mrs. King has devoted much of her energy and attention to developing programs and building the Atlanta-based Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change as a living memorial to her husband's life and dream. Situated in the Freedom Hall complex encircling Dr. King's tomb, The King Center is part of a 23-acre national historic park which includes his birth home, and which hosts over one million visitors a year. For 27 years (1968-1995), Mrs. King devoted her life to developing The King Center, the first institution built in memory of an African American leader. As founding President, Chair, and Chief Executive Officer, she dedicated herself to providing local, national and international programs that have trained tens of thousands of people in Dr. King's philosophy and methods; she guided the creation and housing of the largest archives of documents from the Civil Rights Movement; and, perhaps her greatest legacy after establishing The King Center itself, Mrs. King spearheaded the massive educational and lobbying campaign to establish Dr. King's birthday as a national holiday. In 1983, an act of Congress instituted the Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Holiday Commission, which she chaired for its duration. And in January 1986, Mrs. King oversaw the first legal holiday in honor of her husband--a holiday which has come to be celebrated by millions of people world-wide and, in some form, in over 100 countries.

Coretta Scott King has carried the message of nonviolence and the dream of the beloved community to almost every corner of our nation and globe. She has led goodwill missions to many countries in Africa, Latin America, Europe and Asia. She has spoken at many of history's most massive peace and justice rallies. She served as a Women's Strike for Peace delegate to the seventeen-nation Disarmament Conference in Geneva, Switzerland in 1962. She is the first woman to deliver the class day address at Harvard, and the first woman to preach at a statutory service at St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

A life-long advocate of interracial coalitions, in 1974 Mrs. King formed a broad coalition of over 100 religious, labor, business, civil and women's rights organizations dedicated to a national policy of full employment and equal economic opportunity, as Co-Chair of the Full Employment Action Council. In 1983, she brought together more than 800 human rights organizations to form the Coalition of Conscience, sponsors of the 20th Anniversary March on Washington, until then the largest demonstration in our nation's capital. In 1987, she helped lead a national Mobilization Against Fear and Intimidation in Forsyth County, Georgia. In 1988, she re-convened the Coalition of Conscience for the 25th anniversary of the March on Washington. In preparation for the Reagan-Gorbachev talks, in 1988 she served as head of the U.S. delegation of Women for a Meaningful Summit in Athens, Greece; and in 1990, as the USSR was redefining itself, Mrs. King was co-convener of the Soviet-American Women's Summit in Washington, DC.

Always close to her family, in 1985 Mrs. King and three of her children were arrested at the South African embassy in Washington, DC, for protesting against apartheid. And, in 1995 she turned over leadership of the Center to her son, Dexter Scott King, who served as Chairman, President & CEO until January 2004. On that date, Mrs. King was named interim Chair and her eldest son Martin Luther King, III assumed the leadership position of President & CEO.

One of the most influential African-American leaders of our time, Mrs. King has received honorary doctorates from over 60 colleges and universities; has authored three books and a nationally-syndicated column; and has served on, and helped found, dozens of organizations, including the Black Leadership Forum, the National Black Coalition for Voter Participation, and the Black Leadership Roundtable.

She has dialogued with heads of state, including prime ministers and presidents; and she has put in time on picket lines with welfare rights mothers. She has met with great spiritual leaders, including Pope John Paul, the Dalai Lama, Dorothy Day, and Bishop Desmond Tutu. She has witnessed the historic handshake between Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Chairman Yassir Arafat at the signing of the Middle East Peace Accords. She has stood with Nelson Mandela in Johannesburg when he became South Africa's first democratically-elected president. A woman of wisdom, compassion and vision, Coretta Scott King has tried to make ours a better world and, in the process, has made history.
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 9:51 pm    Post subject: King honored as 'the queen' Reply with quote

King honored as 'the queen'

Mourners filed past the casket of Coretta Scott King on Monday, paying their respects to the "first lady of the civil rights movement" at the historic church where her husband shared his dream for racial equality in the 1960s. At least 1,000 people filled the church's newer facility for a musical tribute. Oprah Winfrey said: "She leaves us all a better America than the America of her childhood."

____________________________________________________________

Music and mourning for Coretta Scott King Ceremonies at her late husband's church
Monday, February 6, 2006; Posted: 6:47 p.m. EST (23:47 GMT)

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/02/06/king.service.ap/index.html

Rev. Jesse Jackson pays his respects at the casket of Coretta Scott King.
Image:


ATLANTA, Georgia (AP) -- Thousands of mourners filed past the casket of Coretta Scott King on Monday, paying their respects to the "first lady of the civil rights movement" at the historic church where her husband shared his dream for racial equality in the 1960s.

People lined up for blocks outside Ebenezer Baptist Church, waiting for hours in freezing rain for a moment to bid farewell to the widow of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

Across the street, at least 1,000 people filled the church's newer facility for a musical tribute, including Oprah Winfrey and other entertainers such as Gladys Knight.

"For me, she embodied royalty. She was the queen," Winfrey said. "You knew she was a force."

Winfrey laughed as she described persuading King to get a new hairdo on her TV show. And she became emotional when she told how King, in the week before her death, sent her a handmade quilt that her husband's mother had passed down.

"She leaves us all a better America than the America of her childhood," Winfrey said.

King, 78, died January 30 at an alternative medicine clinic in Mexico, where doctors said she was battling advanced ovarian cancer. She also had been recovering from a serious stroke and heart attack.

As the service concluded, King's eldest daughter, Yolanda King, told the gathering: "I know it is the prayers of so many of you and from all over the world that carried her safely home. We knew firsthand the enduring power of love."

Inside the silent sanctuary, mourners filed slowly past the casket, some lingering a moment before moving on. A shroud of flowers blanketed the lower half of the casket, and wreaths stood on either side, decorated with roses, King's favorite flower.

Mary Howard-Hamilton, a college professor from Bloomington, Indiana, drove eight hours to Atlanta and then stood in the rain for five more to be among the first to view King's body at the church.

"It's almost like the torch was passed when I walked past her," Howard-Hamilton, 51, said. "I felt empowered. I'm gonna step up now. This fight's not over."

At least 6,000 adults and children passed through the sanctuary in the first three hours, officials said.

During the weekend, some 42,000 mourners walked past King's open casket at the state Capitol, where she became the first woman and the first black person to lie in honor there. It was a striking contrast to the official snub her slain husband had been given by then-Gov. Lester Maddox, an outspoken segregationist.

President Bush and former President Clinton lead the list of dignitaries expected to attend her funeral Tuesday, to be held at New Birth Missionary Baptist Church, a 10,000-seat church in Lithonia where the Kings' youngest child, Bernice, is a minister.

In a proclamation issued on Monday, Bush said flags shall be lowered until sunset on Tuesday at the White House and on all public buildings, U.S. naval vessels, military posts and embassies across the nation and abroad.

Civil rights leaders also planned to memorialize King during a service later Monday that was expected to include the Rev. Jesse Jackson, the Rev. Al Sharpton, Rep. John Lewis, former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young and the Rev. Joseph Lowery.

Workers were expected to erect a temporary, marble mausoleum Monday for King near that of her late husband at the King Center which she founded in his name, said Brandon Shields, president and owner of Marietta-based Roberts-Shields Memorial Company. It will be used temporarily until a structure identical to the slain civil rights leader's can be built.

King suffered a stroke and heart attack last year and had been diagnosed with cancer, but she appeared to be making steps toward recovery, her children said Sunday.

She was to begin treatment at an alternative medical clinic in Mexico the day she died.

"It came as a tremendous shock to us. We had no idea," Yolanda King said at a news conference. "She was walking with a cane, she was speaking more words ... there was clearly progress happening."

Yolanda King said family members had thoroughly researched the clinic and "were stunned when we found out there were problems and challenges there." Mexican authorities shut down the clinic days after King's death, saying it had carried out unproven treatments and unauthorized surgeries. (Full story)

"We're missing her like crazy, but we're just so thankful that we had her as long as we did," Yolanda King said. "She's been released and we feel so strongly that she has reconnected with our father."
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 06, 2006 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Queen of Human Rights Activist and Leader Coretta Scott King Live Forever In Heart and Minds of Millions
mordeh anast ke namash be nikouee nabarand



President Bush and three former presidents -- Carter, Bush and Clinton -- are among 10,000 people mourning Coretta Scott King at her funeral near Atlanta, Georgia. "Every one of us are all the children of Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King, and I, for one, am grateful for her life and her friendship." Clinton said.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/02/07/king.service/index.html


Last edited by cyrus on Tue Feb 07, 2006 11:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 07, 2006 11:09 pm    Post subject: Why US is the most powerful Nation? Reply with quote

Why US is the most powerful Nation in the World and Why Iran under Islamists and Rapists Control has become the most backward and weakest nation ?

Because they don't rape, execute and behead their Queen of Human Rights Activist and Leader as they do in Islamists/Mullahs system in Iran.
The USA government is based on Free Society not Fear Society , Separation of Church and State, respect for Freedom of Press, respect For Human rights and Democracy that the people and government can resolve their differences peacefully and make necessary corrections as needed. Dr Martin Luther King and Mrs. Coretta Scott King as most powerful Human Rights Activist and Leader are considered as best test case scenario for flexibility of US government system that can make corrections as needed without another violent revolution.
The following direction from James Madison say it all:
"If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men! over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions. "
The Federalist No. 51 (James Madison).


These images in this thread are more powerful than any words.

cyrus wrote:
Queen of Human Rights Activist and Leader Coretta Scott King Live Forever In Heart and Minds of Millions

mordeh anast ke namash be nikouee nabarand



President Bush and three former presidents -- Carter, Bush and Clinton -- are among 10,000 people mourning Coretta Scott King at her funeral near Atlanta, Georgia. "Every one of us are all the children of Martin Luther and Coretta Scott King, and I, for one, am grateful for her life and her friendship." Clinton said.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/02/07/king.service/index.html




6 Brave Daughters of IRAN Biography As Part of Million Victims of Islamist Regime in Past 27 Years



In memory of Dr. Farrokhrou Parsa M.D.

Executed on May 8, 1980 in Public


Who was Dr. Farokhrou Parsa?

Over 26 year ago, today, the executioners of the Islamic regime took the life an Iranian woman, known for her courage, integrity and effort in the promotion of education for Iranian women.Dr. Forokhrou Parsa who was a medical doctor was the first Iranian woman who became a deputy and later Minister of Education. Her mother was the founder of the first Iranian journal for women. Rich in her background, Dr. Parsa began a relentless battle in the liberalization of Iranian women. During her tenure as the Minister of education, Millions of female students attended universities and schools and enjoyed the same rights as their male counterparts.

Dr. Parsa's legacy as a courageous woman is an example to all Iranians and especially the women of Iran who have stood firm against the abuses of the regime in every arena. Today, her memory remains in the hearts and minds of thousands of Iranian women.God bless her soul.


In memory of Professor Dr. Homa Darabi M.D.

Professor Dr. Homa Darabi was one of the casualties of this Reign of Islamic Terror. She was a medical doctor specializing in pediatrics, general psychiatry, and child and adolescent psychiatry, and was licensed to practice medicine in New Jersey, New York, and California. In 1990, she was fired from her position as a professor at the School of Medicine at Tehran University due to her non compliance to the Islamic rules of Hijab (Covering up of Women). When a 16 year old girl was shot to death in Northern Tehran for wearing lipstick about a month prior to her death, Dr. Darabi could no longer handle the way women were being treated in Iran, she finally decided to protest the oppression of women by setting herself on fire in a crowded square in northern Tehran, on February 21, 1994. Her last cry was
Death to Tyranny
Long Live Liberty
Long Live Iran
Dr. Homa Darabi : http://www.homa.org/Details.asp?ContentID=2137352839&TOCID=2083225413


In Memory of Ms. Zahra Kazemi


Ms. Zahra Kazemi, a Canadian-Iranian photojournalist, was arrested on June 23, 2003 and was savagely and barbarically beaten to death by Islamic regime officials. News agencies reported that Ms. Kazemi's body was buried on July 23, 2003, in Shiraz, Iran, contrary to the wishes of her family, and repeated formal requests from the Canadian government.

http://activistchat.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=5491

In Memory of Ms. Atefe Rajabi

The murderous mullahs of Iran have executed another minor.
The Heartbreaking And Enraging Story of a 16 Year Old Girl Executed by the Islamist Mafia Mullah Dictatorship on Sunday, August 15, 2004 in the town of Neka, Iran. Please Visit : http://activistchat.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=3661

In Memory of Ms. Parvaneh Forouhar
7 years ago, the knife of islamic republic Mafia silenced the voices of two of Iranís noble children: "
Dariush and Parvaneh Forouhar. But, it did not silence the aspiration of them for democracy, liberty, justice, and freedom. It not only did not silence, but rejuvenated the voices of Iranians rising to the aspiration of the Frouhars. Knives cut flesh, but cannot cut aspirations. Knives silence individuals, but cannot silence a nation. Knives shorten lives, but prolong resolve of the nation. Those who lowered their knives in the hearts of the Frouhars saw the spill of their blood writing on the soil of our nation: Victory Will Be Ours! The enemies of our country unjustly ruling Iran for two decades are doomed! Thatís what that blood said! And thatís what the murderers of islamic republic should take notice of!"
To know more about Ms. Parvaneh Forouhar please visit: http://www.forouharha.com/

In Memory of Princess Leila Pahlavi
Another victim of Islamist Regime:
Visit : http://www.farahpahlavi.org/leila-passing.html
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